Introducing HCL Domino Early Access Program

8. September 2020 Posted by HCL Domino Team

We’re proud to announce the HCL Domino Early Access Programa new program that gives our customers and business partners a chance to test new product features early in the development cycle. This program provides a preview of features and functionality that may be shipped with a future version of HCL Domino and gives us the ability to incorporate your valuable feedback. At this stage, we are providing early access to features that contribute to HCL Domino v12. 

The Early Access Program aims to get feedback on specific features, with a more formal traditional beta program planned at a later stage to receive feedback on the overall release quality and language packaging. 

The Early Access Program is feature-driven and iterative, meaning new iterations and code drops will be made available as soon as it is declared ready for testing by our development team. New code drops can be provided in just a few weeks after the previous one, on short notice, without sticking to a fixed release cycle.  

Based on your feedback we may proceed, improve or adjust the feature, or in some cases withdraw the feature from the code stream. The following graphic illustrates this concept:

Each code drop is provided in the form of a Docker image which enables us to ship new iterations faster and to minimize the time to upgrade from one code drop to the next. You can expect us to deliver code drops at a fast pace as we want participants to have exclusive access to our latest product feature set. Please note that only the newest code drop will be available for you to download.

How to Participate

HCL Ambassadors who have registered Domino v11.0.1 Beta Preview will automatically be added to Domino Early Access Program. Customers and partners with a current Notes/Domino entitlement will also have access to the Early Access Program as of today. There is no need to register separately to participate.

For overall documentation of the Early Access Program, the specific testing scope, system requirements and instructions for deploying the Domino server on Docker, please refer to the release notes or see the online documentation here.

Upcoming Code Drop: Automating Certificate Management

The focus of this first code drop is testing a new feature planned for Domino v12 that allows administrators to automate the creation and management of SSL Certificates for Domino Web servers through the Let’s Encrypt® certificate authority.

Including support for Let’s Encrypt was a feature that was requested on the Domino ideas portal some time ago. We are using this idea as a starting point to modernize the handling of SSL certificates in Domino in general, e.g. by moving away from having to create and manually distribute *.kyr files to your servers.

  • For details about the new automated certificate management feature, please refer to the online documentation here.
  • If you like what we have done, vote for this feature in our Domino ideas forum here.
  • To provide feedback on this code drop, you need to have an HCL account to join the discussion in our forum here.

For general input and new ideas or feature enhancement requests, please use the Domino ideas forum here.

Next Code Drop: TOTP

In the next iteration of the early access program, we intend to provide TOTP (Token based One-Time Password authentication). Stay tuned for more information about the next code drop.

We want Domino to be built for you and by you! We’re excited to include customers and partners as part of the feedback loop as we work towards the release of Domino v12. We look forward to hearing from you!

The post Introducing HCL Domino Early Access Program appeared first on HCL SW Blogs.

Best Practices for Upgrading to v11: Webinar Replay and Q&A

18. August 2020 Posted by HCL Domino Team

Last week, our team of global support advisors hosted a webinar on best practices for upgrading to Domino v11. If you missed the webinar, feel free to watch the replay hereIn this session, we covered several topics on how to prepare for a successful upgrade including:

  • Baseline monitoring: Know your current workloads  
  • Evaluating your environment: Should you upgrade in-place, or do you need new hardware?
  • Deployment sequence: See the order of steps to upgrade your environment 
  • Preparing your environment: What to do before your upgrade 
  • Application upgrades: Learn how to handle your custom apps  

 We received a lot of questions during the webinar and you can find the Q&A recap below.  

 Want to learn more about what’s new in Domino v11 before planning your upgrade? Download this deep dive to see newest featuresFor our technical folks, check out this support article which provides a guide on how to plan your upgrade and a step-by-step guide for Domino install, setup, and upgrade tasks 

Q: Regarding Notes.ini, are there any tools we can use to check the values used in our Notes.ini to identify redundant ones  

A: DCT would be a good place to start, however there is no such tool available for the same. DCT will not detect duplicates. It is a best practice to start with a new notes.ini file. 

Q: Can we get a list of Notes.ini obsolete parameters? 

A: We are working on a consolidated article and will be publishing it soon. 

Q: Is there a URL for recommend new Notes.ini settings to help weed out old Notes.ini settings? 

A: Starting with a new Notes.ini file is the best way to ensure your file does not contain outdated settings.  

Q: Can we have mix of both Domino 9 for applications and Domino 11 for email servers? 

A: Yes, you can upgrade your mail servers to version 11 now, and the application servers can remain at Domino 9.0.1. As mentioned, make sure that you are not mixing Domino versions in a cluster. Use a test pilot to see how well your Domino 9.0.1 applications work in the Notes 11 client. 

Q: Is Domino 11 still restricted to 3 or 4 HTTP headers (via Internet Sites and Rules)? 

A: The limit is now 20 HTTP headers in Domino 11. 

Q: Will HCL be bringing back and upgrading the Domino Configuration tuner (DCT.nsf) 

A: Please vote and comment for the idea here 

Q: Is there a trial of Domino 11 to test the migration? 

A: If you are entitled for Domino, you can download V11 from the HCL License and Delivery Portal and can test your upgrades without needing a trial version of Domino. If you are not entitled to Domino, we provide a free trial as a Docker container (several products are pre-installed and ready to test)More details here.  

Q: Is there a procedure to migrate Domino 9.0.1 to a Domino 11 on docker? 

A: You cannot convert a non-container Domino server to a container-based server. You’ll need to bring up the Docker instance and migrate the data. 

Q: Is LEI (IEI) supported on Domino 11?  

A: Yes, it is now HEI v11.0.1 (HCL Enterprise Integrator) which is supported on Domino 11.0.1 

Q: Is there a specific setting for Infoware UMT tool running on 8.5.3? 

A: Infoware is not an HCL product, please direct this question to your vendor. 

Q: Should I re-install Traveler if upgrading from 11.0.1 to 11.0.1 FP1? 

A:  When you upgrade from 11.0 to 11.0.1 a re-install of Traveler is needed. Simply applying FP1 does not require re-running the Traveler installer. 

Q: Are there special considerations of IBMi and/or Sametime limited use 

A: Sametime 11 is not supported on IBMi  

  • Sametime 11 now supports 64bit Linux as well as Windows. See this requirements article for full details
  • Sametime 11 Limited use has some post installation steps that are important, they are described in this article 
  • For Domino on IBMi, there are some specific hardware requirements in addition to the OS version that you should be aware of. Please see the system requirements for more details 
  • For guidance on installing Domino 11 on IBMisee this article.  
  • For IBMi there is also this post-installation step you should be aware of 

Q: If we’re using Sametime limited use on IBM i, do I suppress nab upgrade? 

A:  Sametime 11 is not supported on IBM i.  Sametime 9.0.1 has not been tested with the Domino 11 NAB design. You can prevent replication of the design in the Advanced Replication properties. 

Q: This will be our first time working on a move and upgrade from mainframe to power. Do you have a guide that we can follow? 

A: From the hardware standpoint, the vendor should be able to provide some guidance. From a Domino standpoint, you can follow the guidance in this Upgrade guide 

Q: How do you manage DAOS encryption on an upgrade using a temporary Server ID? 

A:  You can specify an alternative id using notes.ini setting“DAOS_ENCRYPTION_ALTERNATE_SERVER_ID=otherserver.id” 

Q: Does Domino 11.0.1 require more resources compared to former versions? If there is a performance improvement, how many users can a given Domino server handle now? (Notes Standard vs. iNotes vs. IBM Verse 2.0 vs. HCL Nomad.) 

A: The number of users a given server can handle will vary depending on several factors. The amount of resources, disk, etc. plays a large role. The user behaviors (how they use their mail or applications), policies (like mail retention) all influence server capacity and server sizing.  

Baseline monitoring should give you an idea of how well your server performs today. We expect it to be at least the same or improved in version 11. Some examples of performance improvements (over 9.0.1) include tier 2 DAOS support (less disk I/O), Full Text Indexing and ODS. Vast improvements to NSF (larger ID Tables, larger folders), improvements to TXN logging. Your current OS and new OS may perform differently if you are upgrading from 32 bit to 64 bit for example.  No official benchmarking data is available at this time. 

Q: Is there a command line option to avoid the machine reboot on AIX/Windows if upgrading from Domino 9.0.1 that is enforced by the installer and cannot be interrupted by the installing user? 

A: If you choose a Silent Install it will just perform the necessary reboot if one is needed.  Manual installs you should be given the option to Reboot now or wait until later. 

Make certain you had a clean shut down before you try performing an upgrade. If any Domino files are still in use at the time of installation usually dictates if an OS Reboot will be needed before starting the Domino Server. Domino should not be restarted until the reboot occurs as that is what usually triggers the updating of the files that were in use and then Domino can be started. 

If you shut down Domino and it does not come down cleanly, you can run nsd –kill. With Domino server down, run a Domino maintenance task against a non-existent database name. (For example: “nflxup.exe doesnotexist.nsf”). This step flushes the transactional logs to disk and essentially simulates a clean shut down. 

Q: Will an updated version of the Domino Configuration Tuner Tool be available 

A: Please vote on that idea here 

Q: Can Domino 9.0.1 servers run the pubnames 11.0.1 template while we are upgrading the environment? 

A: Yesof course 

Q: Are there considerations from going from version 9 to version 11, specifically around http services? 

A: Specific to HTTP, there are security improvements. If you had configured sslcipherspec= in notes.ini, those settings have been moved back to the server document in Domino 11. New Domino security features in version 11 may interest you, such as SNI, SAN certificates, http password authentication to the ID in the ID vault, and more.  

Also, we changed the JVM from IBM’s JDK to OpenJDK. You should test any custom applications that rely on the JDK. Many of our customers are making the move to SAML authentication, which was supported in version 9 but we have made continuous improvements in this space since then. In Domino 10 and higher we are now auth-N capable, which removes the IdP limitations we had in version 9.0.1. Any SAML 2.0 compliant IdP should work with Domino 11. 

Q: Is Domino 11 NAB template also compatible with 9.0.1? 

A: Yes, it is.  

Q: Why does ODS need to be updated at the end (especially after the clients)? Shouldn’t it work to have ODS 53 on the server, with an 9.0.1 client using it? 

A: You should upgrade the ODS in order to use the benefits (especially in performance) of the new on disk structure. The ODS version is independent from the clients that are accessing the server. 

Q: ODS Upgrade is the last on your recommended list. Can it be done earlier? 

A: You can upgrade the ODS only after the server has been upgraded, however you can upgrade the ODS with the server if you want. 

Q: Why do you recommend using compact -C to upgrade ODS but not compact -ODS -* -upgrade option? 

A: Either command will work for upgrading ODS (we just left off the other one on the slide).  

Q: Is a Notes 11 Client a requirement for using AD sync? 

A: You must use the Domino 11 administrator client and have a Domino 11 names.nsf design (pubnames.ntf) on a Domino 11 server. 

Q: Can we get more detail on “switching Domino server identity”? Is that as simple as changing the server ID 

A: The easiest way is to keep first 5 lines in notes.ini, start server, and do the server setup again. however, use option that you already have an ID at each step. 

Q: Is AdminP design backward compatible? 

A: Yes, it is. 

Q: If we are currently on 9.0.1, do we need to upgrade the names.nsf design to the latest template?  

A: Yes. Otherwise all the new settings are not available to you. The 11.x design is backward compatible with 9.0.1 servers. 

Q: How would Domino 11 affect applications running on XPages 

A: The JVM changed from IBM to OpenJDK. If you are using JavaScript, be sure to test your application on Domino 11 prior to upgrading. 

Q: Must the Traveler Server be upgraded with the Web Servers? 

A: No, the sequence is a recommendation. You do not have to upgrade traveler servers at the same time as your web servers if they run on standalone machines. If Traveler and HTTP server runs on the same machine, then you have to upgrade both at the same time. 

Q: Will there be issues moving to hyperconvergent environment (nutanix or syneto or …) with disks tiering? 

A: Domino is blind to the lower layers of the stack – we only “see” what the operating system provides.  There are no particular Domino tuning or configuration required for HCI environments like VMware, Nutanix, et al.  (Note that your OS of choice may require configuration/tuning for the HCI platform.) 

Q: Say we have a 4-server environment. When we’ve upgraded the first server, dwe need to worry about the new names.nsf replicating to the other 3 servers? 

A: You should upgrade the Domino directory template, but all the content will remain the same. The Domino 11 names.nsf design is backward compatible with versions down to 9.0.1. If you wish to prevent the design from replicating, uncheck the design box from the Advanced Replication properties. 

Q: Does the “smart upgrade” feature still work for the Notes users upgraded to version 11.x? 

A: Yes, it does. However, we have added an advance AUT feature which is better than Smart Upgrade. 

Q: I am interested in the licensing of Domino 11. Is there more information on the actual cost per user?  

A: Please reach out to your local HCL Product Sales Specialist or HCL Business Partner for licensing questions. Submit a request to have HCL sales contact you here.    

Q: Do you offer remote help to do the upgrade from 9 to 11 as part of our ongoing support? 

AYou can submit a request online to inquire about our professional services, as well as technical support here

The post Best Practices for Upgrading to v11: Webinar Replay and Q&A appeared first on HCL SW Blogs.

Low and Behold: Why Low Code Development Matters. Insights into a modern way to build applications

11. August 2020 Posted by HCL Domino Team

Low code is a software development platform that gives non-coders and coders alike the chance to develop applications through visual interfaces instead of traditional hand-coded programming.  

In plain English, it’s the power to create processes without the technical experience or hand coding background application development once needed.  (It’s like suddenly being able to sing, dance, and generally dominate like Beyoncé without having to undergo 25+ years of endless practice and constant performing.)   

Comparing application development to pop stardom may not be the most common way to highlight the potential benefits of low code. But by not requiring a background in coding expertise, low code allows a wider audience to create applications, making for a faster and potentially more innovative environment that companies can benefit from. (It’s like turning lemonade into even better lemonade. Ok that’s the final reference to Queen B, promise). But we’re just getting started diving into the upside of low code.

Develop Business Software at Incredible Speeds
Low code development should be fast.   

Unlike the laborious line-by-line hand coding process that is traditionally associated with software programming, low code can go from concept to reality in a flash.  Low code allows developers to execute apps up to 60-70% faster than handwritten code, bypassing the time-consuming steps of repeatedly writing, testing and debugging code until it works correctly. 

Lowcode development can give designers drag-and-drop features through a visual user interface, making it easy to build intuitively while cutting down on complicated obstacles that only expert coders can spot and fix.  By making the process more visual and less repetitive, low code brings a newfound velocity to a typically slow undertaking.  

Increase Enterprise Productivity 

When you increase the speed of app building, and you save designers and developers time, you open new space up for productivity throughout the entire enterprise. But it’s not only the efficiencies that companies benefit from. 

Those closest to a problem can fix it without a drawn-out drama that drains weeks of time and energy from the IT department. Solving challenges and automating processes can take minutes not hours, ensuring workflow doesn’t suffer. And, when more people are involved in the design and deployment process, it empowers employees and raises the level of collaboration across the entire organization. 

While Non-Coders Build, Professional Coders can Enhance Enterprise Software 

While a major feature of low code is the inclusion of developers and business users with mixed backgrounds into the app-building process, professional coders also benefit. They gain more flexibility to customize and enhance their work by not getting tied up with repetitive coding.   

Freed from the more tedious aspects of coding, experienced developers can focus on tech strategy as well as making apps as creative and distinct as possible.  By avoiding the complex and painstaking handwritten procedure their talent to create can be fully realized. Getting the best from your most skilled programmers means giving them a lowcode platform enhances your organization’s overall tech-development quality 

Easier Integration and Automated Workflow 

The complexity involved in combining legacy systems, formats and applications makes data integration crucial.  Low code integration is fast and efficient, allowing for faster development cycles and a pronounced focus on outcomes and not production bottlenecks.  

It also allows you to automate business workflows within your app that would otherwise have to be performed manually, a result of working with spreadsheets and long paper trails.  Low code boosts automation and eliminates what can be an error-filled slog through those processes.  

Whether it’s speed, productivity, efficient integration and workflow or enhancing your employees best skills, low code can benefit any enterprise company looking for workflow solutions.  And you don’t have to suffer through decades of coding school to get there.   

Simplify and accelerate your enterprise software development today with Domino Volt by HCL.

The post Low and Behold: Why Low Code Development Matters. Insights into a modern way to build applications appeared first on HCL SW Blogs.